Monday, July 9, 2012

Where you’ll find me today.


I’m hanging out at ACFWOhio today.
Catch my post: ACFW Ohio Goes To Loveland Castle  

at http://acfwohio.blogspot.com/

Until next time. . . 
Sharon A. Lavy

Saturday, July 7, 2012

Wildflowers from Winter


by Katie Ganshert


About the author:
Katie Ganshert was born and raised in the Midwest, where she writes stories about finding faith and falling in love. When she’s not busy plotting her next novel, she enjoys watching movies with her husband, playing make-believe with her wild-child of a son, and chatting with her girlfriends over bagels. She and her husband are in the process of adopting from the Congo. You can find her online at her blog and on Facebook.


The Blurb:
A young architect at a prestigious Chicago firm, Bethany Quinn has built a life far removed from her trailer park teen years. Until an interruption from her estranged mother reveals that tragedy has struck in her hometown and a reluctant Bethany is called back to rural Iowa. Determined to pay her respects while avoiding any emotional entanglements, she vows not to stay long. But the unexpected inheritance of farmland and a startling turn of events in Chicago forces Bethany to come up with a new plan.

Handsome farmhand Evan Price has taken care of the Quinn farm for years. So when Bethany is left the land, he must fight her decisions to realize his dreams. But even as he disagrees with Bethany’s vision, Evan feels drawn to her and the pain she keeps so carefully locked away.

For Bethany, making peace with her past and the God of her childhood doesn’t seem like the path to freedom. Is letting go the only way to new life, love and a peace she’s not even sure exists?


Book Trailer: 



Excerpt:


What Others Say:
 By Sheri Salatin "Farmchick"
This review is from: Wildflowers from Winter: A Novel (Paperback)
If I could only use one word to describe this book it would be:

Heart-wrenching

Okay, so maybe that's two words, but you get my drift.

Oh, my. Bethany Quinn goes through some rough stuff. Her best friend, Robin, from childhood loses her husband. I can't even begin to tell you the tears that I shed for Robin. The grief was so real that I had to put the book down at times, just so I could breathe and grab some more tissues.

Then her grandfather dies and tragedy keeps on rearing its ugly head. Bethany struggles with her non-existent faith, and her mother is victim to a legalistic jerk of a pastor.

Evan Price, the farmhand, is an amazing guy. Strong and real. Gotta love those farm boys!

The characters, oh, the characters in this book. Was this a novel or a biography? Katie Ganshert, how in the world did you write them so real?

Bravo! Well done! But can I admit that I probably won't ever read the story again? It was just too painful of a journey for me. The ended was very well done, so don't worry about it leaving you holding onto a snarled tissue with all hope gone. Quite the contrary.

Many thanks to Water Brook Books for my review copy of this book. All opinion expressed here are mine. :) ~Sheri Salatin

My Take: A book with take home value.
I have a lot of books on my to be read pile. But I have read Katie’s posts as she went through the agony of writing and re-writing this book to get the story structure just right and know that the words I read were the story she was trying to tell. So I put the book on my wish list on Amazon. And when I had some books I just had to buy on the craft of writing, I stuck this lovely novel onto the order.

I was not disappointed. For one thing she brings out my special theme in life. In this story the character Bethany Quinn reinforces my belief in the importance and the need of close friendship with other women.

Purchase The Book At:

Amazon:
Barnes and Noble:
Christianbook:

Or Ask Your Local Library To Order The Book In For You!

Book Contest: See our book contest rules on the sidebar.

I am offering to pass my copy of Wildflowers from Winter on to one blessed reader this week.

Book Contest weeks are from Saturday, when the review is posted through Friday. A new book review is posted each week which may or may not have a contest connected with it. See the Book contest information on the side bar.

Leave a comment on any of my blog my posts this week along with information how to get hold of you if you are the winner. Posts on facebook do not count. We only check the messages on the blog to pick a winner.

Q4U: Did you know reading fiction is good for your brain? For learning how to interact with other real people socially? How many novels have you read so far this year?




Wednesday, July 4, 2012

Blog Hopping Today




Hi, I’m hanging out at the WordServe Water Cooler today.

Catch my post : Will Reading Fiction Turn Men Into . . . Sissies? 

at http://wordservewatercooler.com/

Until next time. . . Sharon A. Lavy

Monday, July 2, 2012

17 Rules Of Etiquette

Author 
Alyice Edrich 

Article Body 
Back in 2006, a young woman named Karolyn wrote to me and said, "I am new to writing and am thinking about joining a writers group, forum, or message board. I don’t want to step on toes, what’s the etiquette for such groups?" 

It's been nearly six years since she asked that question, but the answer I gave her back then still applies today. 

Each writing group has its own set of rules so be sure to check the membership guidelines. Most memberships guidelines are posted somewhere in the forum itself. If you can’t locate a set of guidelines, don’t be afraid to ask the moderator. 

A few rules of thumb: 

1. Always post private replies or simple praises and thank yous off list. 

2. Always sign your name at the end of an email or post. 

3. Keep your taglines short. Your tagline is the two to three sentence blurb under your name. It tells others about your product, service, or website. 

4. Always change the heading of each post to match the topic of your discussion. 

5. Don’t spam list members. Don’t think that because you conversed with one of the list members once that he or she will be interested in your home business, your eBay auction, or other money making scheme. Whether you email him or her privately as a solo email or as a group email, it’s still spamming. 

6. Don’t spam the list. Don’t send irrelevant messages through the lists. In other words, if it’s a writing group, members do not want to read about the latest happenings in your household, forwarded messages from other groups or people you know, or any of those other emails that seem to find their way around the Internet for years and years. 

7. Always cut out the part of the email you are replying to and use that as the beginning of your post. Don’t leave the whole email in tact as it makes it difficult for others to read when on digest or when trying to understand your point. 

8. If a post upsets you or you find you really disagree with what is being said. Stop, take a deep breath, and pray. Wait at least a half hour before posting, then reply. If you reply too soon, your anger or hurt feelings with take over. If you wait, you’ll be able to send a more objective post and your post will come across in a more acceptable way. 

9. Develop a bit of thick skin. People don’t always come across nice in emails and if you don’t have thick skin, it can sting. 

10. Don’t act one way on list and another way off list. In other words, don’t be phony. Don’t be kind to someone on list then privately email mean things to the person or act superior off list. 

11. Stay teachable. Remember that everyone is a student. Even those with hundreds of published articles and/or books and those making a living as a writer full time can still learn something new. And just because someone has a master’s degree and you just have a high school diploma, don’t let him or her bully you off list. That doesn’t make that person better than you. 

12. Be willing to grow. Your writing can become stronger when you take critiques with a grain of salt. In the sense that you listen with an open mind, then you take what you can use and apply it to your work and what you can’t use you ignore. Sometimes critiques of your work are based on fact such as rules of grammar and style and other times they are based on personal opinion. It’s important to learn the difference between the two. 

13. Accept differing opinions. Some people tend to think “It’s my way or the highway.” You have to just let that way of thinking slide right off your shoulders. There are always different ways of doing things and saying things. It’s okay to be different, to want different things, and to do things differently. It’s okay to change with the times. 

14. Some writers are stuck in a certain mindset. They don’t like change and don’t take change very well. Some even consider certain changes beneath them. Don’t let that rub you the wrong way. Understand that is the personality of that writer. Learn what you can from him or her, but you don’t have to stay in the same mindset. It’s okay to learn and grow and change with the times. 

15. Handle people differently—according to his/her personality. My friend recently reminded me that just as Jesus used different methods of delivery when teaching people of his time, from rabbis to children to his apostles to those he healed, we must do the same. We must take into account the person asking the question and adjust our answers accordingly. And we must do the same with those who’ve given answers in which we have a reply or additional comment to make. 

16. Don’t just take, give back. So many people stay in lurk mode. They glean and glean and glean, but they rarely respond or take part in conversations. If you’ve been blessed with valuable information, as soon as you have wisdom to share, share it. 

17. Remember that you joined the group to learn to become a professional writer and to make friends with your colleagues. If you feel, at any time, that the group is dragging you down or distracting you from your goal, it may be time to say goodbye and look for another group. 

Byline 
Alyice Edrich is the author of Tid-Bits For Making Money With E-books. Learn how you can earn a part-time income (or more) selling information on the Internet. All you need is a computer, an Internet connection, a simple website, a merchant account, and of course, a few research and writing skills. Visit http://thedabblingmum.com/ebookstore/business/ebookbiz.htm to order a copy today!