Bio


A Christ follower, Sharon A. Lavy is not Amish. But, as a member of the Old German Baptist Brethren Church, New Conference, she is part of the Ana-Baptist culture.

Sharon grew up in a medical family. Her father was the second or third member of the Old Order Brethren to become a licensed Medical Doctor.

He entered Medical School at George Washington University~~the year Sharon entered the first grade. He earned his tuition money by working the wheat field of Kansas with his father during the summer. The first year Sharon's mother ran a boarding house in Washington D.C. one block from the capital building.

Sharon's parents then moved to Maryland to get out of the city. They, along with another couple,purchased the student book store. Sharon loved to look through her father's medical books, and during her school years she used them for her science fair projects. 

The hospital setting became as familiar as any home. While her father finished his internship and residency in Sacramento, California, Sharon and her siblings explored the hospital on many evenings and weekends. 

Carrying on the family tradition, two sisters, a niece, a granddaughter and a brother-in-law are registered nurses. A sister-in-love and three other grandchildren have also entered the medical field.

Instead of becoming an RN herself, Sharon turned her medical interests into writing fiction with a hospital setting.

Sharon writes Women's Fiction with the theme, "From the ashes of dreams comes the promise of tomorrow." 

Her stories are labeled Old Order Fiction, and readers of her books can expect:

The deep friendship of women in a rural or farming community. 
A medical issue and a hospital setting. 
A puzzle solved,
A spiritual lesson learned. 
A bit of romance.
And a very large cat.


Sharon is a member of:  
           American Christian Writers (ACW)
           American Christian Fiction Writers (ACFW) 
2010-2011 ACFW Membership Officer
2010-2011 OhioValley Zone Director
Member of ACFW Ohio (past president)
Member of ACFW Indiana chapter
          Faith Writers
          Romance Writers of America.
Member of Love Faith & Hope online chapter
          And Writer . . . Interrupted

        Sharon, her husband, and young son moved to a farm in Ohio April 1, 1963. It was not an April Fool's joke. Now forty-nine years later they still enjoy the farming life style.

___________________________________________________________
*~ Why I like Mysteries~*
When we moved to the old Funderburg farmhouse in
January of 1966 it seemed just a normal two-story house.
If only houses could talk, oh what a tale this one could tell.
The barn burnt down years ago and a large brick barn
replaced it.                       
The elderly neighbors told us there was a murder in our springhouse in 1896, seventy years before we moved here.

"But if Albert Frantz were tried today," some say,
"he never would have been found guilty. "
After Albert’s execution the laws of Ohio were  tightened
so that no one in the state would ever again receive the 
death sentence based entirely on circumstantial evidence.
"There's no doubt he shot Bessie Little," Albert’s cousin, Alvin,
said, "but I think that Albert blocked the murder out of his 
mind. You know, the human spirit desires to confess wrongdoing. 
Albert was brought up in a German Baptist Brethren home, and he would have admitted his guilt
if extreme fright had not caused him to obliterate the happening on the bridge from his mind. 
He came actually to believe he was not guilty."

Emma Frantz Lynch, a relative of Albert, came to visit us after we moved to the farm. She old us
Albert Frantz’s parents had lived on this farm and that he had burned down the barn to destroy
the carriage after he had taken Bessie’s body to the river.
Roz Young wrote the story in theDayton Daily News. The story she wrote was a little different. 
(Probably more accurate, who knows?)

Living in this house for thirty-two years I have always been interested in the falsely accused. 
I am also a member of the Old German Baptist Brethren faith. 
Since I write novels about relationships, is it any wonder that my writing tends to follow this trend?